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Halloween

Halloween candy tips

October 30th, 2018

As a parent with 3 kids, I understand not wanting to ruin the fun of Halloween treats. That being said, there are some easy steps you can take to reduce the chances of cavitites as well as help to instill healthy habits-this goes for aduts too! We know that when any food is eaten, the natural bacteria in our mouths produce acid. It is this acid that eats away at the enamel of our teeth and causes tooth decay. It is possible to minimize the effect of all that sugar.

Start with a discussion before Halloween, thinking of ideas about what the family can do with all the candy from trick-or-treating. Our school typically collects candy for the troops after Halloween. This is a great way to give back to those who serve and reduce the number of those tempations around the house. Begin to establish some Halloween candy-eating guidelines. For instance, tell your own trick-or-treaters that they can pick out 25 pieces (or less) of the candy they most want.

Second, after the candy is brought home, help your children pick their treats they can keep. Sticky, gooey candy and items like lollipops and jawbreakers cause the most damage because they stay in the mouth for a long time compared to other candy treats. Plain chocolate bars or chocolate kisses turn out to be the better choices.

Third, eat Halloween candy (or any candy for that matter) immediately after a meal because the acid production from eating has already been activated. Keep in mind that eating candy between meals is not a good idea because of the extra acid it generates in the mouth.

Fourth, everybody should brush thier teeth after eating. If this is not possible or practical, then drink some water to wash away the sugars and starches. The longer these substances stay on your teeth, the more likely they are to cause cavities.

Last of all, keep the candy stash out of sight so no one will be tempted by it – parents included!

The Academy of General Dentistry reports that our nation consumes more than 7 billion pounds of candy each year and Halloween trick-or-treating contributes to a large percentage of that consumption. If we teach our children to use moderation, to make good choices, and to practice good dental hygiene, then it should be a Happy Halloween!

HAPPY HALLOWEEN…. Do You Know How Halloween Came To Be?

October 31st, 2015

Happy Halloween!! Dr. Varghese and our team wanted to be sure to wish our patients a fun-filled day, no matter how you might celebrate this holiday. The Halloween that is familiar to most people today bears little resemblance to the original Halloween; back in the “old days” it wasn’t even called Halloween!

Festival of the Dead

Halloween started out as a Celtic festival of the dead that honored departed loved ones and signified a change in the cycle of the seasons. The Celtic people viewed Halloween, then called “Samhain,” as a very special day – almost like our New Years day in fact, as their new calendar year began on November 1st. Samhain was the last day of autumn, so it was the time to harvest the last of the season’s crops, store food away for winter, and situate livestock comfortably for the upcoming cold weather. The Celts believed that during this day, the last day of winter, the veil between this world and the spirit world is the thinnest, and that the living could communicate with departed loved ones most effectively on Samhain due to this.

Modern Halloween

Halloween as we know it today started because Christian missionaries were working to convert the Celtic people to Christianity. The Celts believed in religious concepts that were not supported by the Christian church, and these practices, which stemmed from Druidism, were perceived by the Christian church as being “devil worship” and dangerous.

When Pope Gregory the First instructed his missionaries to work at converting the Pagan people, he told them to try to incorporate some of the Pagan practices into Christian practices in a limited way. This meant that November 1st became “All Saints Day,” which allowed Pagan people to still celebrate a beloved holiday without violating Christian beliefs.

Today, Halloween has evolved into a day devoted purely to fun, candy, and kids in costumes. What a change from its origins! We encourage all of our patients to have fun during the holiday, but be safe with the treats. Consider giving apples or Pirate's Booty to the kids instead of candy that is potentially damaging to the teeth and gum.

BE AWARE.... Sticky, Chewy and Gummy candies can break or damage orthodontic appliances.

Remind kids to limit their candy intake and brush after eating it! Sweets can cause tooth decay and aggrivate gum disease. So stay warm, safe and of course, have a fun-filled Halloween!

Halloween “TREATS” May Really be “TRICKS”!

October 20th, 2014

We all know exactly what damage sugar and "sticky" candy can do to teeth, so Dr. Varghese wants to remind our currents patients and future patients to be cautious when choosing candy from your bag at the end of your Halloween adventure of "Trick or Treating". So...go ahead and enjoy your treats. We want everyone to enjoy their Halloween....but we also want you to protect the investment you and your family has made in helping us create your beautiful smile, so please be sure your candy is orthodontic and dental friendly! Here are some examples of "Ortho-Friendly Treats": Soft, melt-in-your-mouth chocolates, peanut butter cups, milk shakes, gelatin, peeled, thinly sliced apples and ice cream. Now, here are some examples of "Treats to Avoid":Caramel, nuts, licorice, taffy, jelly beans, hard pretzels, bubble gum, candy corn, lollipops, popcorn with kernels, taco chips and ice. Please do not hesitate to call us if you have specific questions or concerns and of course, DO NOT FORGET TO BRUSH AND FLOSS! We hope everyone has a happy and healthy Halloween!

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